reel reads

Reel Reads for Real Readers: Pulse by Patrick Carman

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Telekinetic super powers in a dystopian world?  Everyone wants you…but for good or evil?  Pulse by Patrick Corman reminds me a lot of the new NBC drama Believe  with a YA twist.

 

 

 

 

Find love, for love in a broken world will comfort you. Hold on to hope; it will sustain you. Have faith, for in the end it will save you.

Reel Reads for Real Readers: We are all MAD here…

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This month’s display in the library is inspired by the Cheshire Cat and zany mix of characters in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland .  

We’re all mad here.

The weeks leading up to and following Spring Break often feel like madness.  But, in the library, we’re mad about books, especially books with mind-bending adventures!

Here are a few books featured this month where readers can expect a wacky, adrenaline packed, adventure with unexpected twists and turns.  Many genres are represented in this month’s display as adventures.

Reel Reads for Real Readers: How to Love by Katie Cotungo

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64664-reelreading2I can be such a girl.  I gravitate to first-love-lost-tales like a moth to a flame.  I’d like to think that I’ve advanced in the stages of a lifelong reader, but whenever one of these young adult novels like Gayle Forman’s Just One Day or  Jenny Han’s The Summer I Turned Pretty surfaces on my radar, I’m right back at reading for autobiographical experiences and little 17-year-old me has her heart broken and repaired over and over again.

What I love about Katie Cotugno’s How to Love is how the author grapples with the reality of first loves.  Recently, I came across a video on Pinterest where Laurie Halse Anderson is talking about her newest novel, The Impossible Knife of Memory.  She discusses her approach of writing an adolescent love story, as not necessarily one of romantic love, but familial love and seperation, finding an adopted family in a group of friends, and then finally that first romance.  How to Love captures the dynamic interrelationship between all of these spheres:  family, friends, and romance.

Reel Reads for Real Readers: YAK Fest ’14 presents Andrew Smith

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64664-reelreading2Throughout the month of January, I’ll be sharing book trailers highlighting the fantastic line-up of authors that will be at this year’s YAK Fest (Young Adult Keller Book Festival) on January 25th at Keller Central High School in Keller, TX.  This will be our third YAK Fest thanks to a generous donation from the Hudson Foundation, which allows us to bring together YA authors and readers for free to attendees!

Visit our Facebook page or website for more info on the event and follow us on Twitter @YAK_Fest #yak14!

I’m thrilled to meet every author coming to YAK, but when I saw that Andrew Smith was in the line-up I literally squealed and ran to see which of his books were on the shelf so I could find readers for them asap!

Andrew Smith’s Marbury Lens and its sequel Passenger are quite the hot commodity thanks in part to an adrenaline-packed, thrilling book trailer.

Make sure you order extra copies for your classroom or library–they’ll be needed after you share this trailer!

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This year, Smith has received a lot of acclaim for Winger from reviewers, librarians, and YA fanatics.

Smart, wickedly funny…In a magnificently frenetic first-person narration that includes clever short comics, charts and diagrams…Smith deftly builds characters—readers will suddenly realize they’ve effortlessly fallen in love with them—and he laces meaning and poignantly real dialogue into uproariously funny scatological and hormonally charged humor, somehow creating a balance between the two that seems to intensify both extremes. Bawdily comic but ultimately devastating, this is unforgettable.”

(Kirkus Reviews, starred review)

Thanks to a terrific librarian-friend,  his next novel, Grasshopper Jungle, arrived today for me to read before I see him in a few weeks!  (*Fangirl squeak of excitement*)

Come meet Andrew Smith on January 25th at YAK Fest ’14!

 

 

Reel Reading for Real Readers: 2013 Re-Cap

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Tomorrow I am hosting a hot chocolate and story time event in the library for classes.  I thought I’d use this opportunity to re-cap some of the hottest YA books from 2013 with readers, hoping to put just a few more books in their hands during Winter Break.

This playlist contains 34 book trailers for YA books released in 2013.  I chose not to include sequels and installments in series, but instead, I’ll be making a special playlist for new installments from 2013.

 

What were your favorites from 2013?

 

Reel Reads for Real Readers

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Thanks to ice-mageddon 2013, I was able to catch up on a sackful of books that I’ve been eager to read. One book in particular captured my rapt attention for an entire evening, enchanting me with a love story I only thought I knew. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson is a gentle, yet fierce retelling of Peter Pan. Narrated by none other thank Tinker Bell herself, the story takes us into the wildest and most compassionate places of Tiger Lily’s heart.

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“Sometimes love means not being able to bear seeing the one you love the way they are, when they’re not what you hoped for them.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZjowrqd3XQ

Reel Reading for Real Readers–The Selection by Kiera Cass

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For thirty-five girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime. The opportunity to escape the life laid out for them since birth. To be swept up in a world of glittering gowns and priceless jewels. To live in a palace and compete for the heart of gorgeous Prince Maxon.

But for America Singer, being Selected is a nightmare. It means turning her back on her secret love with Aspen, who is a caste below her. Leaving her home to enter a fierce competition for a crown she doesn’t want. Living in a palace that is constantly threatened by violent rebel attacks.

Then America meets Prince Maxon. Gradually, she starts to question all the plans she’s made for herself—and realizes that the life she’s always dreamed of may not compare to a future she never imagined.

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Imagine what would happen if the TV series “The Bachelor” got a dystopian make-over.  You’d get Kiera Cass’s The Selection.

I am admittedly drawn to book covers with pretty dresses.  Among some of my favorites are The LuxeMatched, and Wither.  I’m a sucker for ball gowns, which is why I first grabbed Cass’s series.  After I read the summary, however, I was hesitant.  You see, I despise “The Bachelor” for its depiction of self-serving, ruthless, catty, women and misogynistic  GQ-wanna-be boys.  

But, I started reading anyways after several of my regulars demanded that I read nothing else until I had tried The Selection.

Your girls who are already fans of the dystopian will devour this series.  It’s complete with the warring classes, love triangle, plot twists, and budding-heroine.  I also have had great success with my “non-reader” girls.  The science fiction aspect is understated, appearing really only in the fact that the series takes place in the future after World War IV.

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The Elite, which is out now, continues the trilogy with The One set to be released May 6th.

Reel Reading For Real Readers–Ask the Passengers

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Today’s Reel Reading for Real Readers highlights Ask the Passengers by A.S. King.    The titles that appear at the bottom of this glog  all touch upon LGBT themes and issues–but here’s my challenge for you:  don’t keep these books on reserve for “those teens” who might be experiencing issues and conflicts of their own.  I feel like sometimes we reserve LGBT booklists as bibliotherapy for gay teens. I’m a full believer in books as instruments of healing, but I’m also a big believer in the power of books to introducing teens to choices, lifestyles, and experiences that they may never have themselves, but when learning how to be empathetic, they would benefit from reading about.  What I particularly love about these books is that they include a complex cast of characters, representing diversity fully and with intriguing situations and conflicts.

Reel Reading for Real Readers: Summer Lovin’ Book Picks

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 Reel Reading for Real Readers will be taking it’s own summer vacation over at threeteacherstalk.com, but we’ll keep the summer reading fun rolling here :-).

And speaking of summer fun…I am in the mood for all things summer:  sun, road trips, extended lazy-afternoon book reading sessions, and a little romance :-).  One book in particular has done this for me:  Gayle Forman’s Just One Day.

A breathtaking journey toward self-discovery and true love, from the author of If I Stay
When sheltered American good girl Allyson “LuLu” Healey first meets laid-back Dutch actor Willem De Ruiter at an underground performance of Twelfth Night in England, there’s an undeniable spark. After just one day together, that spark bursts into a flame, or so it seems to Allyson, until the following morning, when she wakes up after a whirlwind day in Paris to discover that Willem has left. Over the next year, Allyson embarks on a journey to come to terms with the narrow confines of her life, and through Shakespeare, travel, and a quest for her almost-true-love, to break free of those confines.
Just One Day is the first in a sweepingly romantic duet of novels. Willem’s story—Just One Year—is coming soon! (Goodreads.com)

When I truly love a book, I put off the inevitable end.  True to form, I am holding steady in a landing pattern fifty pages until the end, stealing myself to end my journey Forman’s latest teenage Odyssey.


And if you are looking for a summer romance series to lose yourself in, check out Jenny Han’s The Summer I Turned Pretty and it’s trilogy.


Reel Reading for Real Readers: October Mourning

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Visit Three Teachers Talk for more book trailers for teens every Thursday and join in the meme!

It’s April and the display ideas, special events and activities, and poetry slams are blowing up the school library blogosphere.  We love National Poetry Month.

Today’s book trailer features a novel told through verse, October Mourning, that relates the events of October 6th, 1998 when gay teenager, Mathew Shephard, was lured from a bar, savagely beaten, tied to a fence post, and left to die.  Leslea Newman employs multiple points of view and verse to create a poignant homage and raise awareness of the tragedy.

Sometimes, poetry is the only means to express what our hearts are feeling.  Sometimes, poetry can turn the darkest, ugliest, most tragic moments into opportunities for personal and spiritual growth.